Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Meet us at Liferay DEVCON

The OSGi Alliance is pleased to be attending Liferay DEVCON in Amsterdam in November.  The main conference is taking place November 7 and 8 and we will have an OSGi booth in the exhibition area.  There is also an unconference taking place the day before the main conference on November 6.


We are happy to answer any questions you have about modularity and OSGi technology, the OSGi Alliance, the new R7 release and anything else you can think of that is OSGi related.

We would also encourage anyone who might be interested in joining the OSGi Alliance and contributing to the ongoing evolution and development of the open standard OSGi specifications to come and chat with us at our booth.  Even though R7 is only just out the door, we are already drawing up ideas for Release 8 (R8) and so now is a great time to join us and get involved in the new activities.

Liferay is an extensive user of OSGi technology and we are really pleased to have the opportunity to meet their community of users and developers at this key event.  Ray Augé, a Senior Software Architect at Liferay, and co-chair of the OSGi Enterprise Expert Group, will be presenting on the upcoming OSGi CDI integration specification. Ray's talk will demonstrate common usage patterns and its component model that brings OSGi dynamics; like services and configuration, to CDI and provides for an ecosystem of CDI portable extensions.

You can find out more about this year's Liferay DEVCON including how to register on the conference website.

We realize that this is coming hot on the heels of the OSGi Community Event and EclipseCon Europe in October and Liferay is offering a 25% discount on DEVCON ticket prices to anyone that is attending that event this year too.  To obtain your discount code please see the Liferay advert in the OSGi Community Event and EclipseCon Europe event brochure.

Wednesday, September 5, 2018

OSGi R7 Highlights Blog Series

The OSGi R7 Highlights blog series has come to a close and we certainly want to thank you for following the series and hope you found it insightful and useful!  The series featured posts from technical experts at the OSGi Alliance sharing some of the key highlights of the new R7 release.

Its worth noting that the OSGi Core specification has provided a stable platform for developing modular Java applications for almost two decades. The OSGi Core R7 specification continues this tradition by providing updates to the OSGi Core specification which are fully compatible with previous versions of the OSGi Core specification.  This gives developers and users of OSGi technology an established track record of certainty of their investment protection from adopting OSGi.

The blog posts covered the topics below so if you missed reading any of the posts, be sure to take a moment to check them out.

Feel free to send questions regarding any of the OSGi R7 blog posts to us by email or as comments on the post in question.  We welcome any and all feedback and want to hear from you if you have any suggestions on future topics related to OSGi R7 or otherwise.

OSGi R7 Highlights Blog Series

  • Java 9 Support – Multi-release JAR support and runtime discovery of the packages provided by the JPMS modules loaded by the platform.
  • Declarative Services – Constructor injection and component property types.
  • JAX-RS – A whiteboard model for building JAX-RS microservices.
  • Converter – A package for object type conversion.
  • Cluster Information – Support for using OSGi frameworks in clustered environments.
  • Transaction Control – An OSGi model for transaction life cycle management.
  • Http Whiteboard – Updates to the Http Whiteboard model.
  • Push Streams and Promises – The Promises packages is updated with new methods and an improved implementation and the new Push Streams package provides a stream programming model for asynchronously arriving events.
  • Configurator and Configuration Admin – Configuration Admin is updated to support the new Configurator specification for delivering configuration data in bundles.
  • LogService – A new logging API is added which supports logging levels and dynamic logging administration and a new Push Stream-based means of receiving log entries is also added.
  • Bundle Annotations – Annotations that allow the developer to inform tooling on how to build bundles.
  • CDI – Context and Dependency Injection support for OSGi developers.

Be sure to follow us on Twitter or LinkedIn or subscribe to our Blog feed.

Friday, August 31, 2018

Join us at JUG Thüringen on September 19

Join us for an evening of OSGi on September 19 with the Java User Group Thüringen (@jugthde).
The OSGi Alliance Expert Groups are gathering in Jena that week for their next face-to-face technical meetings. The JUG Thüringen have kindly arranged a meetup on the evening of September 19 at 6pm while the OSGi technical experts are in town.

There will be three, 30-minute 'talklets' and a one-hour open mic discussion session.  Registration is essential and please visit their meetup page for the event to book your place.

Thanks to Intershop for hosting the meeting.
The agenda for the evening meetup is as follows:
18:00 - Open
18:15 - Welcome from Intershop by Johannes Metzner and JUG Thüringen by Benjamin Nothdurft
18:30 - OSGi enRoute Quickstart - A Beginners Guide to OSGi by Tim Ward
19:00 - Gecko.io - Kickstart your professional OSGi Development by Jürgen Albert
19:30 - Intelligent robots - Resolving the promise by Tim Verbelen
20:00 - Break with finger food
20:30 - Open Mic / Panel Discussion (WIP)
21:30 - End with pub visit (Wagnergasse)
Abstracts and further information can be found on the registration page. We hope you can join us.

Friday, August 17, 2018

OSGi R7 Highlights: CDI Integration

The OSGi Enterprise Release 7 specification targeted for release in the coming months contains a brand new specification: CDI Integration. This specification brings the exciting features and capabilities of the Contexts and Dependency Injection (CDI) specification to OSGi.

CDI itself is a vast specification and with that in mind several goals were established to guide the development of the integration:
  1. Do not reinvent the wheel, follow established approaches such as leveraging the CDI Service Provider Interface model
  2. Make code look and feel as natural to CDI developers as possible using CDI designs and best practices where applicable and generally adopt CDI form and function
  3. Provide uncompromising support for key OSGi features such as services, configuration and the dynamics these entail, while not over-complicating or over-engineering the design
  4. Enable modularity for CDI Portable Extensions such that an ecosystem of portable extensions may emerge

Beans

The most basic interaction a developer has with CDI comes from the "Contexts" portion of the spec and the creation of beans, which stems from defining in which context a bean's instances reside. Generally this is accomplished by applying a scope annotation to a POJO.
@ApplicationScoped
public class ShopImpl implements Shop {
  public List<Product> getProducts() { ... }
}
This POJO is a bean whose scope is defined as @ApplicationScoped whose context defines its instance as visible to the entire application.

Injection

The next interaction with CDI comes from the "Dependency Injection" portion of the spec. This is accomplished by applying the @Inject annotation to a field, method or constructor of a POJO.
@ApplicationScoped
public class ShopImpl implements Shop {
  @Inject
  Logger logger;

  public List<Product> getProducts() { ... }
}
This POJO will now have a Logger instance injected into it when the instance is created.

OSGi Services

With a basic understanding of beans and dependency injection let's move on to the OSGi CDI Integration features. The most important feature provided by the CDI integration is the ability to register services with or obtain services from the OSGi service registry.

Registering a service can be as simple as applying the @Service annotation to a bean.
@ApplicationScoped
@Service
public class ShopImpl implements Shop {
  ...
}
This POJO is registered into the service registry with the service type Shop.

Adding service properties is accomplished using annotations that are meta-annotated with the @BeanPropertyType annotation. A couple of examples are the @ServiceDescription and @ServiceRanking annotations defined by this specification.
@ApplicationScoped
@Service
@ServiceDescription("This is the primary implementation of the Shop service.")
@ServiceRanking(1000)
public class ShopImpl implements Shop {
  ...
}

Obtaining services is accomplished by using the @Reference annotation in conjunction with @Inject.
@ApplicationScoped
@Service
public class ShopImpl implements Shop {
  @Inject
  @Reference
  ProductStore productStore;

  public List<Product> getProducts() {
    return productStore.all();
  }
}
This POJO is injected with a service of type ProductStore.

Filtering services is accomplished by specifying a target filter from the @Reference annotation and/or by adding one or more annotations meta-annotated with @BeanPropertyType to the injection point. The following example filters services having the service.vendor service property equal to Acme, Inc.
@ApplicationScoped
@Service
public class ShopImpl implements Shop {
  @Inject
  @Reference
  @ServiceVendor("Acme, Inc.")
  ProductStore productStore;

  public List<Product> getProducts() {
    return productStore.all();
  }
} 
 

Optionality, Cardinality and Dynamics

In OSGi services may need to be expressed in terms of their optionality (if a service is required at all), cardinality (how many services are required) and their dynamics (if the service(s) may change during the lifetime of the bean's context). These concerns are handled elegantly using the Java type system.

The previous example demonstrated a mandatory, unary cardinality reference.

Optional references are expressed using Java's Optional type.
@ApplicationScoped
@Service
public class ShopImpl implements Shop {
  @Inject
  @Reference
  Optional<ProductStore> productStore;

  public List<Product> getProducts() {
    return productStore.map(s -> s.all()).orElse(Collections.emptyList());
  }
}

Multi-cardinality references are expressed using a Collection or List types. The default cardinality in this scenario is 0 (which is to say that the services are optional by default). A minimum cardinality can optionally be expressed in conjunction with multi-cardinality using the @MinimumCardinality annotation.
@ApplicationScoped
@Service
public class ShopImpl implements Shop {
  @Inject
  @Reference
  @MinimumCardinality(1)
  List<ProductStore> productStores;

  public List<Product> getProducts() {
    return productStores.stream().flatMap(
      s -> s.all().stream()
    ).collect(Collectors.toList());
  }
}

Dynamic references are expressed using the Provider type.
@ApplicationScoped
@Service
public class ShopImpl implements Shop {
  @Inject
  @Reference
  Provider<ProductStore> productStore;

  public List<Product> getProducts() {
    return productStore.get().all();
  }
}

Greediness

One of the key distinctions between Declarative Services and CDI Integration with respect to references to services is greediness. Where the greediness of references in Declarative Services is reluctant by default, the greediness of references in CDI Integration is greedy by default. This means that CDI Integration references will always reflect the best service(s) available. This also means that CDI Integration beans may have a more volatile life cycle depending on their references and how often matching services come and go.

Defining a reference to be reluctant is accomplished using the @Reluctant annotation. (This means that once an adequate service is bound it is unlikely to be replaced with a better service in the future.)
@ApplicationScoped
@Service
public class ShopImpl implements Shop {
  @Inject
  @Reference
  @Reluctant
  ProductStore productStore;

  public List<Product> getProducts() {
    return productStore.all();
  }
}

Beans vs. Components

In a traditional CDI application, all beans make up the application and form a single cohesive unit; the CDI container. Modeling external dependencies such as (non-dynamic) references to services and configurations without complexities like proxies or byte code instrumentation means the CDI container has to be treated as a single unit, resulting that whenever any dependency changes in a significant way the entire CDI container must be destroyed and recreated. This is a fundamental difference to the model defined in Declarative Services which permits individual components to exist independently from each other. It is also rather limiting. In order to address this limitation the CDI Integration defines the concept of components. Components are cohesive collections of beans which have a consistent, related life cycle which may operate individually from one another.

The CDI Integration defines 3 component types:
  1. Container Component - All traditional beans (@ApplicationScoped, @RequestScoped, @SessionScoped, @Dependent, custom scopes, etc.) are part of the container component (in fact, any bean which is not @ComponentScoped is part of the container component)
  2. Factory Components - are collections of @ComponentScoped beans rooted by a bean having the stereotype @FactoryComponent (such components are driven by factory configuration)
  3. Single Components - are collections of @ComponentScoped beans rooted by a bean with the stereotype @SingleComponent
These components are arranged in two levels where the container component exists as the first level and any number of factory and/or single component children exist in the second level.

Type (relation to CDI Container)
1 Container Component (1..1)
2 Factory Component (0..n) Single Component (0..n)

Factory and single components exist and react to change independently from each other, just like Declarative Services components, while also depending on the container component. If the container component needs to be recreated then all factory and single components must also be recreated.

With this model, it's possible to replicate the Declarative Services component model, while also supporting the traditional monolithic CDI approach (with the additional capability to share beans between container, factory and single components provided they are @ApplicationScoped or @Dependent and also to use other CDI features like Decorators, Interceptors and CDI Portable Extensions.)

Let's see an example:
@ApplicationScoped
@Service
public class ShopImpl implements Shop {
  @Inject
  @Reference
  Provider<List<ProductStore>> productStores;

  public List<Product> getProducts() {
    return productStores.get().stream().flatMap(
      s -> s.all().stream()
    ).collect(Collectors.toList());
  }
}

@BeanPropertyType
public @interface StoreConfig {
  String vendor_name();
  String data_file();
}

@FactoryComponent("product.store")
@Service
public class ProductStoreImpl implements ProductStore {
  @Inject
  @ComponentProperties
  StoreConfig storeConfig;

  public List<Product> all() {
    return read(storeConfig);
  }
}
This application provides a Shop service that is dynamically tracking a number of ProductStore services. ProductStore instances are created by adding new factory configuration instances using the factory PID product.store. Each ProductStore instance is injected with its component properties which are coerced into a typesafe, user-defined StoreConfig for easy processing.

Conclusion

The CDI Integration specification bridges the powerful features of CDI and OSGi in a clean and concise way which should empower developers. There are many other aspects of the specification that don't fit into a single blog post such as modularity for CDI Portable Extensions, further discussion about BeanPropertyType, configuration dependencies, tracking service events, the relationship with Decorators and Interceptors, etc. So don't forget to read the latest draft of the spec. The CDI Integration specification is an important step forward in OSGi dependency injection story that hopefully opens the OSGi door to a wider audience already familiar with CDI.


Want to find out more about OSGi R7?

Wednesday, August 1, 2018

OSGi Community Event 2018 Talks Announced

We are pleased to announce that the details of the selected talks for this year's Community Event are now available.  You can find the list of talks, titles, and abstracts online.

Congratulations to everyone selected.

Thanks to everybody who made a submission for the OSGi Community Event 2018. We recognize that it takes time and effort and appreciate all of the submissions, whether successful or not.

Forum am Schlosspark -- Venue for the OSGi Community Event 2018

If you are joining us in Ludwigsburg at the event October 23 to 25 then we encourage you to book your tickets early to secure the best price and also to make your hotel reservations as soon as you can as the conference hotel (Nestor Hotel) always sells out well before the event.


Tuesday, July 31, 2018

OSGi R7 Highlights: Bundle Annotations

The OSGi Core Release 7 specification introduces some new bundle annotations for use by programmers. These annotations focus on generating bundle metadata in the bundle's manifest. Like the Declarative Services and Metatype annotations, the bundle annotations are CLASS retention annotations and are intended for use by tools that generate bundles such as Bnd. Bnd includes support for Gradle, Maven and Eclipse via the Bndtools Eclipse plugins.

Package Export


One of the key features of OSGi is, of course, modularity through encapsulation of classes in bundles. But we still need to share classes between bundles to get things done! So importing and exporting package is important. When building bundles, we must make sure that an Export-Package header is present in the bundle's manifest to identify which packages in the bundle are to be exported and thus available for other bundles to import. Normally, the list of packages to export is described to the bundle building tool. For example, when using Bnd, we can specify the -exportcontents or Export-Package instruction in the bnd.bnd file to tell Bnd what packages must be exported from the generated bundle. These instructions support wildcards, include and exclude information so that the bundle developer does not have to list all the desired export package names.

But this information is separate from a package being exported. So a new Export annotation is now available which can be applied to the package source in its package-info.java file.

@org.osgi.annotation.bundle.Export
@org.osgi.annotation.versioning.Version("1.0")
package my.package;

When a bundle containing this package is generated, the Export-Package header in the bundle's manifest will list the package with its version number. When using the Export annotation you must also use the Version annotation to specify the version of the package.

The Export annotation also includes some elements to provide control of the export package information of the package. If you need to specify some specific attributes, or directives, for the package, the attribute element can be used to specify them. Normally when a package is exported, you want it also imported to allow the framework the choice to substitute the import for the export when resolving the bundle at runtime. This is generally the best practice. Bnd will do this automatically when it detects that at least one other package in the bundle uses the exported package. (If no other package in the bundle uses the exported package, then there would be no value in substitutably importing the package.) The substitution element can be used to override the default behavior. Finally, the uses element can be used to replace the calculated uses information of the exported package. These latter two elements are highly specialized and the calculated values are almost always the best choice.

Capabilities and Requirements


The OSGi R4.3 spec introduced the concept of capabilities and requirements to the OSGi specifications which were further refined into the Resource API Specification and Framework Namespaces Specification in OSGi R5.

Capabilities and requirements let a bundle offer capabilities to other bundles and require capabilities from other bundles. This metadata is placed in the Provide-Capability and Require-Capability manifest headers which can be used by resolvers such as the framework resolver to match bundles and wire them together at runtime. Resolving during development, such as in Bnd, or provisioning can also use this information to construct a set of bundles which will work together. So as a developer writing bundles, you want to make sure the capabilities offered by your bundle and requirements needed by your bundle are properly expressed in your bundle's manifest. But writing manifest headers is no fun and subject to mistakes when code if refactored or assembled into a different bundle.

So a new set of annotations is introduced to make managing the capabilities and requirements of a bundle more error-proof and straightforward. The new Capability annotation can be used on a type or package to declare that a capability is offered by that package when it is included in a bundle. The Capability annotation must declare the namespace of the capability and can optionally declare additional information about the capability such as a name, a version, the effective time of the capability, and uses constraints as well as any additional attributes and directives. For example, a Declarative Services SCR extender can use this annotation to declare it offers the extender capability for osgi.component version 1.4.

@Capability(namespace=ExtenderNamespace.EXTENDER_NAMESPACE,
  name="osgi.component", version="1.4.0")

The new Requirement annotation can be used on a type or package to declare that a capability is required by that package when it is included in a bundle. The Requirement annotation must declare the namespace of the requirement and can optionally declare additional information about the requirement such as a name, a version, the effective time of the requirement, and a filter which must match a capability as well as any additional attributes and directives for the requirement. For example, a bundle using  Declarative Services can use this annotation to declare it requires the extender capability for osgi.component version 1.4.

@Requirement(namespace=ExtenderNamespace.EXTENDER_NAMESPACE,
  name="osgi.component", version="1.4.0")

As useful as this is to help generate the proper requirement in the bundle's manifest for a Declarative Services SCR extender, you don't even have to put this in your source code. This is because the Capability and Requirement annotations are supported as meta-annotations! This means you don't have to use these annotations directly in your code, you just need to use an annotation which itself is annotated with these annotations to get their benefit. For example, the RequireServiceComponentRuntime annotation is defined by the Declarative Services specification and it is annotated with the above Requirement annotation example.

@Requirement(namespace = ExtenderNamespace.EXTENDER_NAMESPACE,
  name = "osgi.component", version = "1.4.0")
public @interface RequireServiceComponentRuntime {}

So this captures all the details of the requirement in a single, easy-to-use annotation. Furthermore, the standard Component annotation, which is used by all Declarative Services components, is now annotated with the RequireServiceComponentRuntime annotation. So this means that just by writing a component and using the Component annotation, your bundle's manifest will automatically contain the requirement for the Declarative Services extender capability.

Other OSGi specifications now also take advantage of this meta-annotation support to ensure the proper requirements end up in your bundle's manifest when you use the specification. For example, the Http Whiteboard Specification defines the RequireHttpWhiteboard annotation which is itself annotated with a Requirement for the osgi.http implementation namespace. And most of the Http Whiteboard component property types are themselves annotated with the RequireHttpWhiteboard annotation. So by using one of the Http Whiteboard component property types in your bundle, your bundle's manifest will automatically contain the requirement for the Http Whiteboard implementation capability.

If you define your own capability namespaces for your applications, make sure to define your own requirement annotations annotated with Requirement to make it simple for your users to take advantage of the meta-annotation support and automatically get the desired requirements in their bundle's manifest. You can also use the new Attribute and Directive annotations on the elements of your requirement or capability annotation so that these elements can be automatically mapped onto attributes or directives in the requirement or capability generated in the bundle's manifest.

Simple Manifest Headers


And finally, there is the humble Header annotation. It can be used on a type or package if you just need to get a simple manifest header in the bundle's manifest. For example,

@Header(name=Constants.BUNDLE_CATEGORY, value="osgi")

will put Bundle-Category: osgi in the bundle's manifest.

Conclusion


The addition of the new bundle annotations to the OSGi specifications and support for them in tooling like Bnd make building bundles easier and less error-prone. If you are designing API which includes defining a capability namespace, make sure to design some requirement annotations for your namespace and use them to make users of your API much happier!

PS. While the OSGi Core R7 specification is done, tooling which supports the new bundle annotations may still be under development (at the time of this writing).


Want to find out more about OSGi R7?

This is one post in a series of 12 focused on OSGi R7 Highlights.  Previous posts are:
  1. Proposed Final Draft Now Available
  2. Java 9 Support
  3. Declarative Services
  4. The JAX-RS Whiteboard
  5. The Converter
  6. Cluster Information
  7. Transaction Control
  8. The Http Whiteboard Service
  9. Push Streams and Promises 1.1
  10. Configuration Admin and Configurator
  11. Log Service
Be sure to follow us on Twitter or LinkedIn or subscribe to our Blog feed to find out when it's available.

Thursday, July 26, 2018

OSGi R7 Highlights: Log Service

The OSGi Compendium Release 7 specification contains version 1.4 of the Log Service specification which includes a number of exciting new enhancements and features.

Version 1.4 is a major update to the OSGi Log Service specification. A new logging API is added which supports logging levels and dynamic logging administration. A new Push Stream-based means of receiving log entries is also added. There is also support in the Declarative Services1.4 specification to make it easy to use the new logging API in components.

Logger


Most developers are probably familiar with SLF4J which is a popular logging API for Java. The new Logger interface is inspired by the ideas in SLF4J. The Logger interface allows the bundle developer to:
  • Specify a message, message parameters, and an exception to be logged.
  • Specify the Service associated with the message being logged.
  • Query if a log level is effective.
The logging methods of Logger support curly brace "{}" placeholders to format the message parameters into the message.

logger.error("Cannot access file {}", myFile);

Sometimes message parameters can be expensive to compute, so avoiding computation is important if the log level is not effective. This can be done using either an if block

if (logger.isInfoEnabled()) {
    logger.info("Max {}", Collections.max(processing));
}

or a LoggerConsumer which is convenient with a lambda expression.

logger.info(l -> l.info("Max {}", Collections.max(processing)));

Both the prior examples avoid computation if the log level is not effective. The latter example only calls the lambda expression if the log level is effective.

LoggerFactory


Logger objects can be obtained from the LoggerFactory service using one of the getLogger methods. Loggers are named. Logger names should be in the form of a fully qualified Java class name with segments separated by full stop. For example:

com.foo.Bar

Logger names form a hierarchy. A logger name is said to be an ancestor of another logger name if the logger name followed by a full stop is a prefix of the descendant logger name. The root logger name is the top ancestor of the logger name hierarchy. For example:

com.foo.Bar
com.foo
com
ROOT

Normally the name of the class which is doing the logging is used as the logger name. The LoggerFactory service can be used to obtain two types of Logger objects: Logger and FormatterLogger. The Logger object uses SLF4J-style ("{}") placeholders for message formatting. The FormatterLogger object use printf-style placeholders from java.util.Formatter for message formatting. The following FormatterLogger example uses printf-style placeholders:

FormatterLogger logger = loggerFactory.getLogger(Bar.class, FormatterLogger.class);
logger.error("Cannot access file %s", myFile);

The old LogService service extends the new LoggerFactory service and the original methods on LogService are now deprecated in favor of the new LoggerFactory methods.

Logger Configuration


A LoggerAdmin service is defined which allows for the configuration of Loggers. The LoggerAdmin service can be used to obtain the LoggerContext for a bundle. Each bundle may have its own named LoggerContext based upon its bundle symbolic name, bundle version, and bundle location. There is also a root LoggerContext from which all named LoggerContexts inherit so default logging configuration can be set in the root LoggerContext.

If Configuration Admin is present, then logger configuration information can be stored in Configuration Admin. This allows external logger configuration such as via the Configurator Specification.


Receiving Log Entries

The Log Service specification has never dealt with persisting or displaying log entries. It provides API for logging and another API for receiving what has been logged. This latter API can then be used to store logged information in any place appropriate for the application. Since Release 1, the LogReaderService has provided access to logged information. This service predates the formulation of the Whiteboard pattern and is thus out-of-date with OSGi best practices. For the version 1.4 update of the Log Service specification, we added a newer, more modern way to receive logged information: the LogStreamProvider service. The Log Stream Provider uses the new Push Stream API added for R7. To receive a stream of LogEntry objects pushed as they are created, use the createStream method to receive a PushStream<LogEntry> object.

logStreamProvider.createStream()
  .forEach(this::writeToLogFile)
  .onResolve(this::closeLogFile);

The stream can be created with any past history if desired.

logStreamProvider.createStream(LogStreamProvider.Options.HISTORY)
  .forEach(this::writeToLogFile)
  .onResolve(this::closeLogFile);

The LogEntry interface has also been updated to return additional information about the log entry. It now contains the name of the Logger used to create the entry, location and thread information about the source of the log entry creation, and a sequence number so that log entry creation order can be inspected.

Conclusion

Version 1.4 of the Log Service is a pretty significant update to the specification. It includes a much more modern API for both logging information and receiving logged information as well as the ability to configure the log levels of loggers and bundles. Make sure to try it out in your next project. The Eclipse Equinox framework 3.13.0 implements version 1.4 of the Log Service specification and the companion bundle registers the LogStreamProvider service if you want to use it.



Want to find out more about OSGi R7?

This is one post in a series of 12 focused on OSGi R7 Highlights.  Previous posts are:
  1. Proposed Final Draft Now Available
  2. Java 9 Support
  3. Declarative Services
  4. The JAX-RS Whiteboard
  5. The Converter
  6. Cluster Information
  7. Transaction Control
  8. The Http Whiteboard Service
  9. Push Streams and Promises 1.1
  10. Configuration Admin and Configurator
Be sure to follow us on Twitter or LinkedIn or subscribe to our Blog feed to find out when it's available.